Intellectual Property Law Knowledge Center

Posts Tagged ‘intellectual property law’

Typing (Yes, Typing) Tips in Intellectual Property Law

September 8th, 2020

Here are a few quick tips on typing IP-related characters in Microsoft Word and Outlook, and a tip on pasting that is not IP-specific but is worth knowing.

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Mark My Words! – Heed Patent Marking Requirements

July 29th, 2020

Congratulations! You’ve just been awarded a patent on your invention, which you are now manufacturing or otherwise using. You want to be certain that you will be able to enforce your patent and to collect any damages to which you are entitled, should someone infringe it. Now what?

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Flimsy Sealing Order Request Results in the Disclosure of ‘Confidential’ Information

July 9th, 2020

The Federal Circuit today affirmed a district court’s denial of a motion for reconsideration of an intervenor’s opposition to a motion to seal.  In Uniloc 2017 LLC v. Apple, Inc., 2019-1922 (Fed. Cir. Jul. 9, 2020), Uniloc had moved to seal the briefing and record associated with Apple’s motion to dismiss premised on a defect in Uniloc’s ownership rights due to a loan default.  The request covered two categories of documents: (1) company confidential materials and (2) third party confidential materials.  Non-party Electronic Frontier Foundation intervened to obtain public access to the supposedly confidential documents. 

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Inter Partes Reviews – Patent Owners to Get a Helping Hand?

May 28th, 2020

Proposed rule changes by the United States Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) published on May 27, 2020 may finally help improve patent owners’ odds of avoiding inter partes reviews (IPRs). 

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Patent Admissions are Forever, But They Are Usually Not Your Best Friend

March 17th, 2020

One of the most important messages parents convey to their children about their online presence is that the internet is forever. Images and messages posted online are an indelible mark that may be difficult, if not impossible to remove.

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USPTO Announces New Trademark Rule Requiring Foreign Entities to be Represented by Qualified U.S. Attorney

July 30th, 2019

Effective August 3, 2019, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) has amended its Rules of Practice in Trademark Cases to require foreign applicants, registrants, and parties to trademark proceedings before the USPTO’s Trademark Trial and Appeal Board to be represented by a qualified U.S. attorney.

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Are You Offended?: Scandalous and Disparaging Trademarks

January 17th, 2019

Not every name or brand is eligible for federal trademark registration with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO). One of the reasons the USPTO might reject an application to register a trademark is because the trademark is considered offensive.

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Waiting to Enforce your Trademark Rights

November 20th, 2018

Owning a trademark brings certain benefits and obligations. If you are the first entity in a particular geographic area to use a distinctive word (or phrase, logo, color, etc.) to sell a product or to provide a service, then you may claim exclusive rights in that area for that trademark on those products or services. Your trademark rights allow you to preclude subsequent entities in the same area from using the same, or confusingly similar, trademark on related products or services.

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Understanding the Use of Decision Trees in Mediation

November 8th, 2018

A useful tool in preparing for mediation or in a mediation itself is a decision tree. Decision trees, also known as flow charts, help attorneys to make decisions early in the mediation process and plan for potential outcomes.

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What do the ™, ℠, ®, ©, and “Pat. Pend.” Symbols Mean? How should I use them?

September 5th, 2018

Intellectual property assets are valuable. One way to maintain the value of those assets is to correctly use the applicable notice, shown as symbols or specific phrasing, that publicly designate the type of protection claimed.

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